Catching the wave: 21st century careers

02Anthony Haynes writes: What’s your image of a university press? Perhaps an organisation that produces esoteric, ivory-tower, publications that sit, largely unread, in academic libraries.

Not so Deloitte University Press. Deloitte University specialises in leadership. Its press continues that theme in the sense of thought leadership. Its publications cover contemporary challenges in such areas as technology, industry, and social change. I typically find their reports refreshing in terms of content and attractively designed too.

Today’s post concerns their recently published report by Josh Bersin, Catch the wave: the 21st century career, explores how employers can respond to the changing career landscape:

“In an age where skill sets can become obsolete in just a few years, many workers are scrambling just to stay current. How can organizations encourage continuous learning, improve individual mobility, and foster a growth mind-set in every employee, year after year?”

Not all of Bersin’s brief report is ground-breaking. I wonder whether there is anyone left who needs to be told that ‘the idea of a single, long-lasting career is becoming a thing of the past, for example’.

But I did find plenty of stimulating ideas. In particular, Bersin writes that his research has revealed that one type of job that has been attracting growing remuneration is the hybrid job, that is ‘jobs that create whole new job categories by mashing up disciplines’:

‘These “renaissance jobs” are those that combine technical expertise (in one or more domains) with expertise in design, project management, or client and customer interaction. They might be titled “experience architect” or “IoT engineer” or “user experience designer” or “security consultant,” and they typically involve knowledge of a technical domain, problem-solving capability, project management, and often industry expertise.’

The report also includes a list of leading practices for stimulating employee learning to foster adaptation.

 

 

 

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